Moniker

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About || Users || Development || Download || Issues

News: I've just released an offline version of Moniker! It was coded in Java rather than AppInventor, making it much more fast and stable. Stay tuned for more news!

Moniker is an App Inventor app that allows its users to classify camera trap photos, according to the species and the number of animals contained in the image.

When Moniker first starts up, it will give the user two options, to begin downloading .zip files containing camera trap images or to begin classifying the photos. On the Downloads screen, the user can type in the address containing the .zip file that he or she would like to download. After pressing the download button, Moniker will save the address for use again later, and then open up an external application called FileDownloader. FileDownloader will download the specified .zip file and unzip it, as well as extract the names of all the individual files in the .zip file and the animal names and pass them onto App Inventor (Moniker).

The way a user sorts the photos is simple. On the sort screen, the downloaded images from a .zip file will already be pulled up by Moniker onto the screen. At this point, the photos are "unsorted." From here, the user can select a species and a number to associate with each photo. Afterwards, the user can then either upload the saved/ sorted photos or view an individual saved photo. Uploading the saved photos will send strings that will tell the server to move the photos to the correct animal folders. Viewing a saved photo will enable the user to edit the species and number for that particular photo.

Moniker was developed for and sponsored by the US Fish & Wildlife Service.

If you would like to learn more about Moniker and its development from this past summer, please click on the Development link located above.


Developers of the Haiti Commodity Collector app

  • Jason Baird
  • Megan Chiu
  • Advisors :

  • Professor Ralph Morelli
  • Professor Joan Morrison
  • Professor Jim Sanderson
  • Personal tools
    NSF K-12